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    The following is a guest blog post from Kathlyn Stone, who is an Associate Editor for HealthNewsReview.org. After reading the NEJM’s recent reader poll on conflict-of-interest rules, one gets the sense that the NEJM is still trying to frame the discussion. The poll appears as a follow-up to Lisa Rosenbaum’s widely panned 3-part series on physician-industry […]

    The post NEJM reignites conflict-of-interest debate with reader poll appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    Yesterday, HealthNewsReview.org Associate Editor Kathlyn Stone summarized ongoing reaction to the New England Journal of Medicine’s long-winded series justifying closer ties between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry. She noted that the NEJM itself had pioneered today’s conflict of interest disclosure policies, and that throughout the 1990s, its editors would not publish editorials or review articles […]

    The post Former NEJM editors slam “backtrack” on conflict of interest appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    A research letter in this week’s JAMA Internal Medicine addresses an issue that has become a pet peeve of ours: the failure of medical journal articles, journal news releases, and subsequent news releases, to address the limitations of observational studies. Observational studies, although important, cannot prove cause-and-effect; they can show statistical association but that does not […]

    The post Weak reporting of limitations of observational research appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    31 years ago, as a young medical news reporter for CNN, I was upset because a story I’d been working on was bumped from a newscast in favor of a story about a JAMA journal article of a single case study, “Tight-jeans meralgia: hot or cold,” about a woman experiencing nerve problems attributed to wearing jeans that were […]

    The post Skinny jeans & nerve damage case studies have haunted me throughout my career appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    This week The BMJ sent journalists a news release, “Regular consumption of spicy foods linked to lower risk of death.” The second paragraph – the third sentence overall – of the news release read: “This is an observational study so no definitive conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect, but the authors call for more research […]

    The post Medical journal news releases CAN make a difference appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    Shortly after praising a news release by The BMJ earlier today for emphasizing the limitations of an observational study, another news release for another journal published by BMJ is at the other end of the spectrum. “Fatherhood at young age linked to greater likelihood of mid-life death,” is the headline of a news release about […]

    The post Troubled BMJ news release on young fathers & early death risk appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    A Viewpoint article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), “Confluence, Not Conflict of Interest: Name Change Necessary,” caught the eye of Dr. Richard Lehman, who writes the wonderful journal review blog for The BMJ. First, an excerpt from the JAMA piece to give you a sense of what it’s about: “The term […]

    The post “Disingenuous denial” of medical research conflicts of interest appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    It’s difficult to make a case for hiding or obscuring information about health and the medicines we take, but it seems the editors of two top medical journals are doing just that. The decisions of these editors substantially affect the quality of medical research studies reported, what public relations officials communicate about those studies, and […]

    The post Top journal editors resist transparency appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    This is the second in an unplanned, occasional series about real people who are harmed by inaccurate, imbalanced, incomplete, misleading media messages.  The first was about a man with glioblastoma brain cancer. People with rare diseases may hang on any crumb of possible good news more than anyone else.  Many have learned how to find […]

    The post Podcast: Rare disease foundation says medical journal misled patients appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    The following is a guest blog post from one of our contributors, Susan Molchan, MD, a psychiatrist in the Washington, DC, area. She’s been closely following, and criticizing, NEJM’s stance on data-sharing and conflicts of interest. Last week, many media outlets, including the New York Times, reported on concerns about the validity of a huge, […]

    The post Xarelto controversy highlights need for more transparency at NEJM appeared first on HealthNewsReview.org.


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    A research letter in this week’s JAMA Internal Medicine addresses an issue that has become a pet peeve of ours: the failure of medical journal articles, journal news releases, and subsequent news releases, to address the limitations of observational studies. Observational studies, although important, cannot prove cause-and-effect; they can show statistical association but that does not […]

    0 0

    31 years ago, as a young medical news reporter for CNN, I was upset because a story I’d been working on was bumped from a newscast in favor of a story about a JAMA journal article of a single case study, “Tight-jeans meralgia: hot or cold,” about a woman experiencing nerve problems attributed to wearing jeans that were […]

    0 0

    This week The BMJ sent journalists a news release, “Regular consumption of spicy foods linked to lower risk of death.” The second paragraph – the third sentence overall – of the news release read: “This is an observational study so no definitive conclusions can be drawn about cause and effect, but the authors call for more research […]

    0 0

    Shortly after praising a news release by The BMJ earlier today for emphasizing the limitations of an observational study, another news release for another journal published by BMJ is at the other end of the spectrum. “Fatherhood at young age linked to greater likelihood of mid-life death,” is the headline of a news release about […]

    0 0

    A Viewpoint article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), “Confluence, Not Conflict of Interest: Name Change Necessary,” caught the eye of Dr. Richard Lehman, who writes the wonderful journal review blog for The BMJ. First, an excerpt from the JAMA piece to give you a sense of what it’s about: “The term […]

    0 0

    It’s difficult to make a case for hiding or obscuring information about health and the medicines we take, but it seems the editors of two top medical journals are doing just that. The decisions of these editors substantially affect the quality of medical research studies reported, what public relations officials communicate about those studies, and […]

    0 0

    This is the second in an unplanned, occasional series about real people who are harmed by inaccurate, imbalanced, incomplete, misleading media messages.  The first was about a man with glioblastoma brain cancer. People with rare diseases may hang on any crumb of possible good news more than anyone else.  Many have learned how to find […]

    0 0

    The following is a guest blog post from one of our contributors, Susan Molchan, MD, a psychiatrist in the Washington, DC, area. She’s been closely following, and criticizing, NEJM’s stance on data-sharing and conflicts of interest. Last week, many media outlets, including the New York Times, reported on concerns about the validity of a huge, […]

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    opioid epidemic“Falsehood flies, and the Truth comes limping after it; so that when Men come to be undeceiv’d, it is too late; the Jest is over, and the Tale has had its Effect…”       Jonathan Swift, The Examiner, 1710 A very short letter published on January 10th, 1980, in The New England Journal of Medicine […]

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    brain dementia mental healthWithin the past couple of months the BMJ published two separate observational studies looking at how two very different lifestyle factors might impact memory and dementia. Both studies draw from the same group of research subjects: the Whitehall II cohort, which has followed roughly 10,000 British civil service workers for the past 30 years or so. […]

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